ETECH inside case studies

Problem:

A very large number of BGAs needed to be reballed in a tight time frame. The customer had not been able to find a company to either do the work at all or do the work in the time frame alloted.

Solution:

eTech reballed 15,000 BGAs in six weeks for the client. Although the reballing was not a particularly difficult job in itself, no other rework specialist was able to supply the requisite number of technicians to complete the work in the time given. We created a standardized process for our staff to follow, and were able to average 500 BGAs per day to complete the work. (We routinely complete over 1,000 per week, and when we commit to a deadline, we meet that goal.)

Problem:

A Customer who is to provide Clinical electronic Charts for Hospitals was in need of BGA rework for the PCBs. During the process of assembling their boards and final testing, the customer realized that the chips on the boards were failing - either due to bad chips or manufacturing issues. The manufacturing engineers turned to eTech for a solution.

Solution:

The plan put forth was to take 6 first article bards and rework 3 of them with new chips from a different lot. In addition, the other 3 boards were baked for 24 hours and the BGA was removed. A BGA reball process was used on the old chips and they were placed using the same rework process as was used on the new BGAs. Results of the testing proved that the 3 new BGAs worked fine while the reballed BGAs failed. The customer was then able to work with their chip supplier on a possible bad of BGAs.

In the meantime the total quantity of boards was reworked with new BGAs and the boards were successfully rolled out to their customer.

Problem:

An independent contractor for the United Stated Air Force had the need of some repairs on their GPS HPA Module Stations. The modules contained some transistors that short circuited causing a solder bridge. The independent contractor called on us to rework and re-pot the transistors in accordance with IPC class 3 standards. Without these module stations the Air Force could not fulfill some mission capabilities.

Solution:

Upon being contacted by the independent contractor eTech had suggested that they ship 2 of the module stations for a “first article” run. Once the module stations arrived our senior technician discovered that this rework was going to be an “out-of-the-box” project. The module stations were made of aluminum in which the board of transistors laid. In order to re-pot the transistors the modules would need to be pre-heated to a temperature that would liquefy the solder. Furthermore this would have to be done without damaging the module station or other components. Using an oven the module stations were pre-heated to start the process. In order to keep the modules heated they were placed on an IR heater while the soldering process was completed. The replacement transistors were repotted and leads were soldered to the board in a liquefied state. Once the transistors were placed the module stations then moved to an area to cool down. After repair the transistors were placed they then had to be cleaned and inspected in the accordance with IPC class 3 standards.

Ultimately, eTech was able to provide the outstanding support this customer needed. Due to the rapid response the Air Force was able to accomplish a milestone that was going to be a difficult task. eTech was able to support this independent contractor in a way that enabled the Air Force to fulfill 3 mission capability deficiencies that they have come across with their GPS stations. Since we first received the 2 “first run” articles the contractor has sent 20 or more of these modules stations to be reworked.

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